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Published: Sunday, February 26, 2012, 12:01 a.m.

Acting your age means taking time to explore your passions

"Act your age."
We've all heard it. Shucks, we've all said it. But what does it mean?
Judging by the profiles and stories in this edition of Vitality, acting your age means having the time to explore your passions.
Gorge "Flash" Perez, a distinguished white-haired gentleman, is a self-described ham. At 64, he works out mornings at the gym before his full-time job as a checker at the 41st Avenue Safeway in Everett. Evenings, you'll find him in an usher's uniform at the Silvertips game.
The husband and father is a civic advocate for the homeless, an active church member and a fisherman. George has a passion for sports and for staying busy.
Marily Parish, 53, of Everett, climbed Mount Kilimanjaro in January. Her traveling companion? Her 85-year-old father, John Parish. The Parishes have a passion for helping people. The climb was a fundraising effort to help children orphaned by AIDS.
Boeing engineer Charles Hower, 52, loves to fly. He looks forward to retirement so he can be free: Not free of work, free to teach flying or maybe conduct tours in a plane. Until then, he studies to be part of a group of volunteers who train pilots.
For the members of the many and varied churches and temples in the area, acting your age means exploring spirituality in a faith community. It means having the time to volunteer after a busy work life. It means solace and support.
What does "act your age" mean? It means doing what you love, helping people, learning new skills. It means whatever you want it to.
In this issue of Vitality:
Handy apps: Tablets let you mind your schedule, track medicines and even talk face-to-face with faraway grandkids.
What a journey: A father and daughter climb Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa to raise money for orphaned children.
Your gateway to fun: Hiking, kayaking and ice cream socials are just the start of popular activities at the Stillaguamish Senior Center.
Up, up and away: Full-time jobs can't keep two hobby pilots away from their passion.
The days are packed: George Perez took a second job as an usher at Comcast Arena just for fun.
Open arms: Faith communities offer support, care and camaraderie to seniors.
No-slip tips: How to handle wet and hazardous weather.

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